A Nostalgic Journey in & around the Original Village of ...

NOTICE BOARD

Friday, 27th April 2018.

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1. PHOTO GALLERY

  • * NEW *

    Ladies' Lunch
  •  

    Well Bank Road
  • * NEW *

    Sept 1962 Timetable
  • * UPGRADE *

    Welfare Hall
  •  

    Rear Of Terrace

1.1  Super quality B&W picture of a Ladies' Lunch / Meeting held inside Usworth Colliery Miners' Welfare Hall.

1.2  Well Bank Road / Top of The Drive - one of Washington's major bus routes.  Looking towards High Usworth.

1.3  Timetable (existing) now complemented by an image posted by Sunderland Antiquarian Society - a 1963 diesel train.

1.4  Upgraded picture:  More content and far better quality.  Links to Washington Welfare Hall article - see 'Heyday' Tab.

1.5  A vastly superior replacement image showing this well-known Terrace as demolition time approached.  Name it!

* NEW *


Where's this Location?

Another Major Bus Route

There's a Family Butcher's Shop in front
of the camera and a Pub behind.


2. ARTICLES, SELECTIONS, MAPS ETC.

 


Go to Last Tab - No.5

 


One For Portillo Fans!

 


Early Factory

2.1  Added to the 'Then & Now' Collection:  Washington Glebe Colliery, its entrance on The Avenue and Map of Area.

2.2  Bradshaw 1887: Sunderland to Bishop Auckland railway timetable, including fares to Coxgreen and Penshaw.

2.3  This picture in a small collection showing one of the New Town's earliest factories - Radio Corporation of America.

* NEW *


Go to Tab No.4

Over 50 Years ago:

Saint Bede's Church

Added to our 'Then & Now' Collection.
Built on the once busy 39 Bus route, c.1965.

There's a short addendum that might interest you:
The Bridge over The Burn.
Plus Maps.


3. OTHER STUFF

'What's Where'  &  'How To Get There'

( Click one of these great pictures. )

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The Content of this Website was provided by the People of Washington.

You are welcome to download any non-copyright images that you would like to keep or print.
If you wish to upload images to another website, please mention raggyspelk.co.uk.


"Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it."

Lucy Maud Montgomery
(1874-1942)